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Archives CME |

Archives of NeurologyReader's Choice: Continuing Medical Education FREE

[+] Author Affiliations

Section Editor: Menken Matthew, MD


Arch Neurol. 1999;56(12):1538-1539. doi:10.1001/archneur.56.12.1538.
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Physicians with current and valid licenses in the United States, Canada, or Mexico who read any 3 of the selected continuing medical education (CME) articles in this issue of Archives of Neurology, complete the CME Evaluation Form, and fax it to the number or mail it to the address at the bottom of the CME Evaluation Form are eligible for category 1 CME credit. There is no charge.

The American Medical Association (AMA) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to sponsor continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this educational activity for up to 3 hours of category 1 CME credit per Archives of Neurologyissue toward the AMA Physician's Recognition Award (PRA). Each physician should claim only those hours of credit that were actually spent in this educational activity.

Physicians with current and valid licenses in the United States, Mexico, or Canada are eligible for CME credit even if they live or practice in other countries. Physicians licensed in other countries are also welcome to participate in this CME activity. However, the PRA is only available to physicians licensed in the United States, Canada, or Mexico.

The Archives of Neurologyprovides new evidence for the practice of neurology, neurosurgery, and other specialties whose goal is to improve the neurological health of all people. Original contributions, neurological reviews, neurology and public health, and history of neurology are among the categories of articles published, but all contributions receive a sympathetic reading by the Chief Editor. The journal's editorial board sets the initial framework for the types of articles published, which is then modified by feedback from editors, external peer reviewers, authors, and readers. We are keen to receive submissions from practicing neurologists to provide new insight for colleagues.

We want our readers to assess each article critically; this CME activity is active, not passive. Does the article contribute in some way to the practice of neurology? How could you modify your practice style to incorporate what you have learned? How can you acquire more information, challenge the authors' conclusions, or verify what you have read? Which of the articles in each issue is least helpful in your quest for the best and most applicable evidence?

To earn 1 hour of category 1 CME credit, you should read any 3of the CME articles listed and complete the CME Evaluation Form. To earn 3 hours of credit, read allof the articles listed on the next page and complete the CME Evaluation Form. The CME Evaluation Form must be submitted within 4 weeks of the issue date. A certificate awarding up to 3 hours of category 1 CME credit will be faxed or mailed to you; it is then your responsibility to maintain a record of credit received. Questions about CME processing should be directed to The Blackstone Group; fax: (213) 269-1636.

The articles listed below may be read for CME credit.

The Role of Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer DiseaseArticle

Educational Objective:To learn about oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease.

Single-Cell Molecular Biology: Implications for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Neurological DiseaseArticle

Educational Objective:To understand the perturbations at the cellular level that affect neurological diagnosis and treatment.

Neurochemical Markers Do Not Correlate With Cognitive Decline in the Lewy Body Variant of Alzheimer DiseaseArticle

Educational Objective:To investigate the relationship between neurochemical markers and clinical markers with cognitive decline in the Lewy body variant of Alzheimer disease.

Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Kennedy SyndromeArticle

Educational Objective:To diagnose regional metabolic abnormalities in Kennedy disease.

Correlation of Basal Ganglia Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy With Apgar Score in Perinatal AsphyxiaArticle

Educational Objective:To learn about brain metabolism in perinatal asphyxia.

Preliminary Observations on APOE ϵ4 Allele and Progression of Disability in Multiple SclerosisArticle

Educational Objective:To examine the association of apolipoprotein E genotype with clinical aspects of multiple sclerosis.

The Utility of Apolipoprotein E Genotyping in the Diagnosis of Alzheimer Disease in a Community-Based Case SeriesArticle

Educational Objective:To evaluate the usefulness of apolipoprotein E genotype in the diagnosis of community-based Alzheimer disease.

Resetting of Orthostatic Tremor Associated With Cerebellar Cortical Atrophy by Transcranial Magnetic StimulationArticle

Educational Objective:To recognize the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation on orthostatic tremor.

Mother With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Daughter With Creutzfeldt-Jakob DiseaseArticle

Educational Objective:To read about the neurogenetics of a mother with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and a daughter with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

Accumulation of Neurofilaments and SOD1-Immunoreactive Products in a Patient With Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis With I113TSOD1MutationArticle

Educational Objective:To learn about the neuropathology and neurogenetics of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

One and One-half Syndrome With Supranuclear Facial WeaknessArticle

Educational Objective:To recognize the neurologic findings in a patient with a pontine tegmental stroke.

Substance Abuse, Neurobiology, and IdeologyArticle

Educational Objective:To learn about the neurobiology and neuroideology of substance abuse.

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Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
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