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In This Issue of JAMA Neurology |

In This Issue of JAMA Neurology FREE

JAMA Neurol. 2013;70(3):293-294. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.1610.
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MECHANISMS OF PROTEIN SEEDING IN NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES

Walker and colleaguesArticle review evidence that β-amyloid and tau proteins, which aggregate to form senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, respectively, are induced to misfold and self-assemble by templated conformational change. They describe the potential role of protein seeding in the instigation and spread of the cardinal lesions that characterize Alzheimer disease.

Place holder to copy figure label and caption

Graphic Jump LocationImage not available.

Age-associated development of neurofibrillary lesions in the dentate gyrus of mice expressing human tau selectively in the entorhinal cortex. The dentate gyrus lacks Alz50 immunoreactivity at age 12 months (A), but by age 24 months, numerous granule cells are immunopositive (B). These lesions include human tau despite the fact that human tau messenger RNA was not detectable within the cells (scale bar = 100 μm).

A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH TO THE DIAGNOSIS OF SUSPECTED CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM LYMPHOMA

Scott et alArticle conducted a review of the literature to identify data on the usefulness of brain and body imaging, serum and cerebrospinal fluid studies, ophthalmologic examination, and tissue biopsy in the diagnosis of central nervous system lymphoma.

POSTERIOR CINGULATE GLUCOSE METABOLISM, HIPPOCAMPAL GLUCOSE METABOLISM, AND HIPPOCAMPAL VOLUME IN COGNITIVELY NORMAL, LATE-MIDDLE-AGED PERSONS AT 3 LEVELS OF GENETIC RISK FOR ALZHEIMER DISEASE

In a cross-sectional comparison of measurements of cerebral glucose metabolism and brain volume in cognitively normal, late-middle-aged persons, Protas and coauthorsArticle characterize and compare the measurements so as to distinguish these persons with 2, 1, or 0 copies of the APOE ϵ4 allele, reflecting 3 levels of risk for late-onset Alzheimer disease. Editorial perspective is provided by William Jagust, MDArticle.

NEUROIMAGING OF COGNITIVE DYSFUNCTION AND DEPRESSION IN AGING RETIRED NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE PLAYERS: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

Hart et alArticle assessed the prevalence of cognitive impairment and depression in a sample of former National Football League players and identified neuroimaging correlates of these dysfunctions. Editorial perspective is provided by Ramon Diaz-Arrastia, MD, PhD, and Daniel Perl, MDArticle.

RELIABILITY OF CLASSIFYING MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS DISEASE ACTIVITY USING MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING IN A MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS CLINIC

In an observational study, Erbayat Altay et alArticle assess the reliability of new magnetic resonance imaging lesion counts by clinicians in a multiple sclerosis specialty clinic.

ENRICHED CD161HIGH CCR6+ ΓΔ T CELLS IN THE CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OF PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

Schirmer et alArticle investigate the expression of CD161 (KLRB1) and CCR6 on human γδ T cells in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with a clinically isolated syndrome and multiple sclerosis in relapse.

TIMING OF RECANALIZATION AFTER INTRAVENOUS THROMBOLYSIS AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER ACUTE ISCHEMIC STROKE

Yeo and colleaguesArticle conducted a longitudinal cohort study of consecutive intravenous tissue plasminogen activator–treated patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) from 2007 through 2010 to examine the timing and impact of recanalization on functional outcomes in AIS.

HOSPITAL-ONSET SEIZURES: AN INPATIENT STUDY

Fields and coworkersArticle used a retrospective medical record review to analyze hospital-onset seizure patterns, medication use, and outcomes in 218 patients admitted to the hospital for nonseizure reasons.

DISTINCT CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF C9ORF72 EXPANSION CARRIERS COMPARED WITH GRN, MAPT, AND NONMUTATION CARRIERS IN A FLANDERS-BELGIAN FTLD COHORT

Van Langenhove and colleaguesArticle conducted a study to characterize patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with a repeat expansion mutation in the gene C9orf72, and to determine whether there are differences in the clinical presentation compared with FTLD carriers of a mutation in GRN or MAPT or with patients with FTLD without mutation.

CARDIAC DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED RISK OF NONAMNESTIC COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT: STRONGER EFFECT ON WOMEN

I n a prospective, population-based, cohort study of 2719 participants with a median 4.0 years of follow-up, Roberts and coworkersArticle investigate the association of cardiac disease with amnestic and nonamnestic mild cognitive impairment.

LATE-LIFE DEPRESSION, MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT, AND DEMENTIA

Richard et alArticle evaluate the association of late-life depression with mild cognitive impairment and dementia in a multiethnic community cohort including 2160 individuals aged 65 years or older.

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Age-associated development of neurofibrillary lesions in the dentate gyrus of mice expressing human tau selectively in the entorhinal cortex. The dentate gyrus lacks Alz50 immunoreactivity at age 12 months (A), but by age 24 months, numerous granule cells are immunopositive (B). These lesions include human tau despite the fact that human tau messenger RNA was not detectable within the cells (scale bar = 100 μm).

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