0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Special Article |

Coping With Death and Dying on a Neurology Inpatient Service Death Rounds as an Educational Initiative for Residents

Sandeep Khot, MD, MPH; Martha Billings, MD; Darrell Owens, DNP, PhD; W. T. Longstreth, MD, MPH
Arch Neurol. 2011;68(11):1395-1397. doi:10.1001/archneurol.2011.618.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Background Residents in neurology may feel unprepared to care for dying patients. We developed Death Rounds to provide emotional support and end-of-life care teaching for residents caring for dying patients on the inpatient neurology service. Death Rounds are monthly 1-hour clinical case discussions where residents identify issues through shared experiences.

Objective To survey neurology residents' perceptions of Death Rounds with respect to end-of-life care teaching and emotional support.

Design, Setting, and Participants We conducted an electronic survey of all (n = 26) neurology residents and recent residency graduates at the University of Washington 2 years after instituting monthly Death Rounds.

Main Outcome Measure The survey consisted of 10 questions examining residents' perceptions of the extent to which Death Rounds provided emotional support and end-of-life care teaching. We dichotomized responses to statements about Death Rounds as agree or disagree.

Results All 26 residents responded to the survey and attended at least 1 Death Rounds session. More than half of residents attended more than 3 sessions. Residents agreed that Death Rounds helped them cope with dying patients (17 residents [65%]), delivered closure for the team (16 residents [61%]), and provided emotional support, more for the team (18 residents [69%]) than the individual (10 residents [38%]). Most residents felt that Death Rounds provided useful teaching about end-of-life care (18 residents [69%]), and they were satisfied overall with Death Rounds (16 residents [61%]).

Conclusions Death Rounds afford an opportunity for physicians-in-training to process as a group their feelings, intense emotions, and insecurities while learning from the dying process. In our inpatient neurology service, most residents found it a rewarding and valuable experience.

Figures in this Article

Sign in

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal
• Rent this article ?

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Graphic Jump Location

Figure. Results of the electronic survey examining residents' perceptions of Death Rounds. Residents were asked to specify their level of agreement with the extent Death Rounds provided help with end-of-life care (EOLC) teaching (A) and support for the individual and team (B) on a 4-point Likert scale. The responses are dichotomized, with a vertical line dividing “little or none” and “somewhat” as the disagree group vs “considerably” and “extremely” as the agree group.

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Also Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
Please click the checkbox indicating that you have read the full article in order to submit your answers.
Your answers have been saved for later.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

457 Views
10 Citations
×

Sign in

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal
• Rent this article ?

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Articles Related By Topic
Related Collections
Jobs
JAMAevidence.com

The Rational Clinical Examination: Evidence-Based Clinical Diagnosis
Quick Reference

The Rational Clinical Examination: Evidence-Based Clinical Diagnosis
Quick Reference

brightcove.createExperiences();